AFTER DEATH COMMUNICATION “ADC”

 

After Death Communication can be viewed from a few perspectives such as;

  • There is no such thing
  • I think I believe but where is the proof
  • I believe and I don’t need proof

 The information below was found on the internet and explains ADC according to researchers Bill and Judy Guggenheim. http://www.after-death.com/Default.aspx (retrieved Jan. 4/13)

“An After-Death Communication (ADC) is a spiritual experience, which occurs when you are contacted directly and spontaneously by a deceased family member or friend, without the use of psychics, mediums, rituals, or devices of any kind. It’s estimated that 50-100 million Americans – 20-40% of the population of the United States – have had one or more ADC experiences. Therefore, ADCs provide convincing new evidence for life after death.”

What is the definition of “contacted”?  Perhaps, this is can be viewed as;

  • Seeing a spirit
  • Hearing a voice
  • Mental telepathy
  • A sense of someone being there
  • A dream that seems real

Picture yourself for a moment and imagine how you would react to a direct and spontaneous contact from a family member or friend.  Would you react with;

  • Disbelief
  • Fear
  • Joy
  • Acceptance
  • Relief
  • Hope

I wonder how many reading this article have had ADC experiences.  Have you spoken of them to anyone?  Who would you talk to about this?  When discussing this topic does fear enter the picture and if so, why? 

Some individuals mention not feeling a connection to an individual after they die and wonder why some others say they are still connected in a special way. 

I don’t know the answer to this, but why do some people get messages or some form of contact after a person dies and other people want the connection very strongly, but receive nothing?

Do you think experiencing ADC would make the grieving process easier or would it create more upsets?

A few books to consider if you are interested in more on After Death Communication are;

“Hello from Heaven” by Bill and Judy Guggenheim.

“A Breath Away” by Lynda Matthews  (non-fiction)

I welcome and encourage your comments.  This information is presented to provide a different view of loss as with many of the articles I post.

All my best,

             Barbara 

 

 

Image courtesy of Salvatore Vuono /FreeDigitalPhotos.net